Tuesday, March 11, 2014

{Tutorial} How to Sew a Pocket Diaper with Free Pattern and Photos




When we first started cloth diapering I purchased a couple different brands of cloth diapers and each had things that I liked and other things that I didn’t like. I wanted something that wasn’t super bulky and would fit my skinny kid plus was adjustable. I spent hours trying to find a pattern online but couldn’t find one so I decided to make my own. This is the pattern/instructions that I came up with. There are a lot of steps so this tutorial will be long but I feel the length of time it takes to sew the extra steps (verses a standard pocket diaper) are worth it.

Features of this pocket diaper:
This diaper is truly one size – it adjusts with hidden buttonhole elastic. I feel like diapers that adjust with snaps in the front (called rise snaps) were too bulky. So I designed the leg elastic and the back elastic to be adjustable. The elastic is hidden in the pocket so it doesn’t touch baby’s skin.

Easy to change elastic if elastic wears out – You don’t have to unpick anything or re-sew anything. Just pull the elastic out and thread in a new elastic.

A large pocket opening – Most pocket diapers that I tried had a rather small opening for stuffing in the inserts that I could barely get my hand into. So I made this one larger so it would be easy to stuff but still small enough that it isn’t bulky.


A PUL outside layer – I love that PUL makes the diaper waterproof without adding bulk.

Snap closure so the diapers will last longer. I am not a fan of Velcro (aka hook and loop), it wears out quickly and it sticks to everything. You can use hook and loop if you want to though.

Fits a wide variety of children -  My friend started using hers when her baby was about 9 pounds. They may be a tad bulky on a baby who is smaller but all cloth diapers are a little bulky and babies grow quick so it won’t be bulky very long. UPDATE: I am also in the process of making a newborn insert which will reduce the bulk further! The diapers fit my skinny 22 pound 2 year old very well and also fit my friend's other child - a chunky two and a half year old who weighs 35 pounds!



The absorbency can be customized by simply stuffing with more or less inserts. Smaller babies usually need less absorbency, so by only inserting one insert bulk can be reduced. Or if your baby is older and wets heavily you can stuff with more inserts. Whatever you need :)


Materials You Will Need For the Diaper:
1. PUL (for outer layer).

2. Wicking Jersey, microfleece, micro suede, or minky (for the inner layer). Or you can choose whatever fabric works best for you. See *Notes* section.

3. Buttonhole elastic. Approximately 1 yard per diaper. I purchased mine through www.diapersewingsupplies.com

4. Buttons – 6 buttons per diaper. About 6/16 inch is the prefect size but they can be a bit smaller or larger and it will be fine. We found cheap ones at Walmart.

5. Snaps – 14 sets per diaper.

6. Thread – Use 100% polyester thread. Do NOT use cotton thread or polyester coated thread or you risk the chance of wicking through the thread which can cause leaks.


Materials You Will Need for the Inserts
1. Your choice of fabric for the outer layer – I used cotton velour *see notes for more info*. But next time I would try using a smooth cotton interlock or smooth bamboo interlock fabric instead. Or you can upcycle any fabric that is at least 80% cotton or bamboo or more (T-shirts, sheets, flannel, blankets, etc)

2. Fabric for the inner layer – I used Zorb 1 which I purchased from www.Wazoodle.com

3. Thread
*Notes*
1. I purchased two sizes of PUL – The first one was from a co-op and the description said it was “about 60” wide”. It was all less than 60” and I could easily get 6 diapers from each yard and if I was really careful sometimes I could get 7 diapers. The second PUL I purchased was 64” wide and I could very easily get 8 diapers per yard of fabric.

2. I mostly used wicking jersey for the inside layer because when it gets wet it feels dry against baby’s skin and it does not stain very easily; however it is not super soft when lined dry (but it isn’t too rough either). I also made a few diaper inners from micro-fleece (the anti-pilling micro fleece from Joann’s) and I like them because the micro-fleece stays really soft; however, it is not as “stay dry” as wicking jersey. If I were making another full stash I think I would do half wicking jersey and half micro-fleece because I don’t like to have the same fabric against baby’s skin all the time.

I did make one diaper using minky as the inner fabric. It feels very wet when it gets wet so I do not really like it. I have never tried micro-suede.

3. The wicking jersey I purchased from www.wazoodle.com. It is 60” wide and I got 8 diapers per yard if I was very careful.

4. For the inserts I used one layer of Zorb 1, sandwiched between two layers of cotton velour. I like the Zorb for daytime diapering (it washes very clean and doesn’t hold odors!). However, I do not like the cotton velour as much as I thought I would. Cotton velour is really soft when dried in the dryer but it is not as soft when line dried. It’s not a big deal because the inserts are not touching baby’s skin. However, a fellow cloth diaper blogger recommended using a smooth cotton interlock or bamboo interlock on the inserts instead of cotton velour which will keep the absorbency but stay soft and will make the inserts easy to stuff in the pocket.

UPDATE - (Advice from a fellow cloth diaper blogger/mama) Don't use minky on your inserts - the minky used by commercial diaper companies is not the same minky you will find in fabric stores. The minky fabric from the fabric stores is not absorbent, it is wicking/stay-dry; when paired with a stay-dry diaper inner layer, the two layers will not wick well, which can cause leaks.

5. I made two inserts per diaper rather than one thick insert. This allows me to customize the absorbency more. Also having two thinner inserts allows the inserts to get cleaner in the wash and they dry faster. This was very important to me. I am also in the process of making a newborn sized insert to reduce bulk on small children.

Supplies You Will Need:
- Pattern - Download Here
- Pins
- Scissors
- Sewing Machine
- (Optional) Cardboard to trace the pattern onto (this makes it a lot easier to trace the pattern onto your fabric)
- A Pen
- Serger (optional – but gives it more of a professional finished look and really helps when making the inserts)
This tutorial is for a pocket diaper

ALL SEAM ALLOWANCES ARE ½” UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED!!


Part 1 – Sewing the PUL (The Outer Layer)


NOTE: PUL has a right side and a wrong side just like any other fabric. The right side looks like fabric and sometimes will have a pattern on it. The wrong side has a more plastic look and usually doesn’t have the pattern printed on it.

Step 1: Print out the pattern, cut it out, and tape it together. There should be 5 pages to the PUL layer portion of the pattern plus one PUL reinforcement page. If you are going to make more than a few diapers, I suggest making a cardboard pattern because it is a lot easier to trace than paper. The finished pattern should look similar to this:


Step 2: Trace the pattern onto the wrong side of the fabric. Arrange the pattern in a similar fashion to use the most fabric possible.

Step 3: Cut out the PUL pieces.

Step 4: Cut out the PUL reinforcement piece out of scraps.  It should look like this (before it is cut out):


Step 5: Turn the main PUL diaper cut over so the right side is facing up. Set the pattern over the fabric, lining up the outside lines. Transfer the snap markings from the pattern to the right side of the PUL.

Step 6: Pin the PUL reinforcement piece onto the wrong side of the large PUL diaper cut. Yours will look a little different than the one in the picture. After I made half my diapers like the one in the picture, I realized it works better if the reinforcement piece isn’t as big so I then started making a smaller one. Make the smaller one like the pattern shows– I promise it makes the diaper easier to use.


Step 7: Sew around the outside edges. Make sure to sew inside the ½” seam allowance.


Step 8: To make the casing for the back elastic - Write the following diagram on the wrong side of the back panel of the PUL layer:


Step 9: Cut down to the ½ inch line.


Step 10: Pin like this:

Step 11: Then fold the fabric down even with the last line and pin like this:


Step 12: Turn the fabric over so the right side is facing up. Sew about 13/16” from the edge making sure to catch the elastic casing.





Step 13: Add the tummy panel snaps. Using the marks that were transferred from the pattern to the tummy panel fabric put the snaps on. Make sure that the cap of the snap is on the wrong side of the fabric.  The finished snaps and PUL fabric will look like the picture (ignore the serging and sewing on the outside edges of the PUL – I forgot to take a picture of the snaps and finished PUL layer by themselves).



Part 2 – Sewing the Inner Layer

Step 14: Print out the pattern, cut it out, and tape it together. Again, if you are going to make more than a few diapers, I suggest making a cardboard pattern because it is a lot easier to trace than paper. You will need both the pattern for the main body of the inner layer as well as the pattern for the inner layer reinforcement pieces. The pattern will be similar shape as the PUL layer.

Step 15: Lay the pattern on the wrong side of the wicking jersey (or whatever fabric you are using for the inside of your diapers), trace, and cut out. Cut the reinforcement pieces on the right side of the fabric. Make sure to transfer the markings for the buttons onto the reinforcement pieces.

Step 16: On the wrong side of the inner layer fabric, pin the reinforcement pieces in place with the reinforcement pieces right side up so you can see the button markings. Sew around the outside edges as shown in the picture.


Step 17: Serge across the top as shown. This step is optional, but it does make the finished product look more professional.


Step 18: This step is optional especially if you serged across the top. It does not affect the functionality of the diaper, just the finished look. Follow instructions on photo.



Step 19: Sew buttons on where you marked them.




Part 3 – Putting the Pieces Together

Step 20: Put right sides together of the PUL piece and the inner fabric piece. Line up outside edges and pin together.

Step 21: Sew around outside using a ½” seam allowance. Start at one side of the pocket opening and end at the other side. Do not sew the pocket opening shut! (Sorry this picture has the next few steps in it too).


Step 22: (optional) Serge along the outside edge. Make sure you don’t serge into the seam you just sewed. Don’t serge along the top, start on the sides as the picture shows.


Step 23. Cut the corners so when you turn everything right side out the corners lay flat.



Step 24: Turn the diaper right side out. Push all the corners out so they are as square as you can get them.

Step 25: Top stitch following the picture. Start and stop before you get to the reinforcement seam.




Step 26: Sew the elastic casings for the leg elastic. Top stitch according to picture.




Step 27: Put the snaps on the wings, follow the marks transferred from the pattern on the outside of the PUL. (I apply snaps with snap pliers that I purchased at Joann fabric). Make sure that the cap of the snap is on the outside/PUL layer and that the stud of the snap is on the wicking jersey/inner layer.


Step 28:  Cut elastic – Cut one pack piece approximately 11 inches long and two leg elastics approximately 12.25 inches long each, Fold the edges of the elastic under about 1/4” and then again another 1/4”. Sew in place with a zig zag stitch. Repeat for all the edges.


Step 29: Thread elastic through elastic casings and secure on the buttons. A safety pin makes this a lot easier.

Your pocket diaper is now finished!! Yay!


Part 4 – Making the Inserts

Newborn Insert Instructions click here 

Infant Insert Instructions Coming soon!

108 comments :

  1. Thanks for the great step by step guide. I always used disposable diapers with my kids. but my sister in law sews and she might be cloth diapering (I am not sure), so I will show her this just in case :)

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  2. My baby days are over But I want to share this post with my sister in law as she is expecting in the end of May.

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  3. This is the best tutorial I've seen for cloth diapering! Pinning for gift ideas - great job!

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  4. I wish I would have tried cloth diapering when my boys were little. I am night training my youngest now. I've been searching for cloth ones for him. If my machine wasn't on the fritz I'd try your version!

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  5. Wow!! what a fantastic tutorial!! I love that you added and adjustable waist to them too

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  6. Wow, what an instructional and helfpul tutorial. Diapers can be so expensive, so I bet you save a lot of money making your own.

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  7. This is so cool, a friend of mine is interested in clothe diapers. I will share this with her. Maybe she will find this helpful and get inspired to make her own.

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  8. That's brilliant to make them yourself! I'm afraid I'm past those years, but wow, you're so smart to do it!

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  9. Thankfully, I am past the diaper stage, but you did a great job explaining how to make this. I will share with friends who have kids in the diaper stage.

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  10. Wow. They look amazing. it looks as if you purchased them. You are very talented

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  11. These diapers are really nice and they look so easy to make. I had no idea that cloth diapers had become so stylish.

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  12. This looks complex but I'm sure once I do the first or 2nd set I would be good to go! Thanks for the tutorial!

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  13. Whenever the time comes for me to have kiddos, I am definitely gonna give cloth diapering a try. This would come in handy so thanks for sharing :)

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  14. Aisha Kristine ChongMarch 13, 2014 at 2:45 AM

    Whoa, that looks hard lol - but its amazing how you did it! <3

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  15. Those are adorable! I wish I knew about all the great cloth options when my son was in diapers.

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  16. Thankfully we are passed the diaper stage, but I think this is a very helpful tutorial for those who still have babies in diapers and want to cloth diaper them.

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  17. This is an excellent, very detailed tutorial. I definitely do not miss changing dirty diapers but these might have made the job a little less yucky! So cute!

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  18. That's a great tutorial. I have a few cloth diapers that I received for my own toddler. I don't have a sewing machine but I would have made my own as well, it would definitely work out a lot cheaper.

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  19. This is really cool! I don't have kids in diapers anymore but I'll pass this awesome tutorial on to my friends that do.

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  20. I love products like these, and even better with a DIY! If I ever decide to have kids, I'd visit this again!

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  21. Great diaper pattern, thank you for sharing it with us all.

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  22. I have really been wanting to try to make my own pockets for a while, but I didn't know where to start. These are very thorough and I appreciate you taking the time to make sure to write down everything!

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  23. Oh my goodness! This is the best pocket diaper tutorial I've seen yet! I loved Pocket diapers for my daughter when she was in cloth diapers. They were my favorite. I wish I had this tutorial back then! They are so expensive to buy!

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  24. I never used cloth diapers with my boys, but I have to say the one you made is super cute. It came out awesome and I love your step by step instructions.

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  25. What a good idea to make one on your own. I've never really thought to do it, but it's ideal for more than one reason, isn't it? Very cool!

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  26. I wish I knew how to sew.. This is a cute way to save some money! I plan to do cloth diapers with the next child. I may need to learn to sew by then!

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  27. wow this is a fantastic tutorial! the cloth nappy came out great

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  28. Thank you for posting this! I always wanted to try cloth diapers, but never wanted to shell out the money for them. I'm sure this is way cheaper and fun too! I will have to save this for the next little one :)

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  29. I am way passed the diaper stage, but I would have loved this tutorial when my kids were babies! We could have saved a ton of money on diapers! You did a good job of explaining everything so well in the tutorial!

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  30. Aw, that is so cute and surely a big savings! But, I am not a DIY type of a mommy. That surely a lot of works. Good for you and that requires a talent.

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  31. Great tutorial! I know lots of people who have jumped on the cloth diaper bandwagon!

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  32. What a great guide! I wanted to try pocket diapers on my son, but was so overwhelmed and scared of leaking, I gave up.

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  33. Ok bear with me, I am ignorant when it comes to crafty things. Is the PUL the layer that holds the moisture away? They look very cute, just trying to understand the construction.

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    1. The PUL is a waterproof layer. It goes on the backside of the diaper so nothing leaks through onto baby's clothes :)

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  34. You are so talented. If I tried to make those, they would nothing like that.

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  35. What a great tutorial. This seems like some work but you seem to have a great handle on it. I know someone who is having a baby that would be interested in this and I will pass this along.

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  36. How awesome and a wonderful DIY tutorial for sure thank you.

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  37. Great tutorial! This is so much cuter than the cloth diapers I wore as a baby.

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  38. What a great idea and a good way to save money. You can also have several different patterns which I like a variety.

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  39. I love the step by step instructions. This is a great looking diaper. So cool that is has a waterproof outer layer.

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  40. Okay, THAT is cute! You are super talented!

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  41. this is so cool. Honestly it looks a bit too complicated for me, but I am sure it was a walk in the park for you :-)

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  42. Another awesome tutorial...my next grandbaby is going to have a slew of cloth diapers.

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  43. WOW this is so cool. You are very talented and if I ever have any more babies I will be sure to do this. I am going to pass along to my other mommy friends. thanks for sharing

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  44. What a great tutorial! I really wish I had seen this before! But will save it for the future. YOu are really talented!

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  45. Great step by step instructions on making a pocket diaper. I preferred fitted but we used a lot of pockets too.

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  46. I have tried to sew before but always messed it up. Your directions are AWESOME though! I love the step by step directions with pictures. :)

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  47. Makes me want to have another baby :D Thank you for this tutorial. Saved the link for future reference.

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  48. I wish i'd tried cloth diapers with kiddo when he was a baby. Your tutorial is great and the instructions are so clear. Maybe I'll make one for my niece and then my sister might switch over to cloth diapers!

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  49. You are a cloth diaper wiz! Another one to save for the future :)

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  50. This is a great, thorough tutorial! I never did cloth diapers with mine, but I might have if I knew how to make these!

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  51. So awesome! Would definitely save money and the environment!

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  52. The directions are spot on! I wish I could have done this when my kids were little! Great job!

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  53. Hi, I am trying to download some of your free patterns from you web page, but I can't download in a way to be able to print the patterns or tutorial. I am sewing diapers to take over to Ethiopia on my next trip to help.
    Any ideas or tips/tricks?

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    1. It is working fine for me. All you need to do is click on the link in the post which will take you to google docs. Then click on the individual pictures and click "download" on the bottom right. Once it downloads (it will download as a PDF) click print. Good luck!

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  54. Thanks for the help, was able to get the tutorial and pattern for the pocket diaper with button hole elastic adjustments

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  55. Just the pictures that are not showing up on this page didn't print

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  56. Thanks for a great tutorial! This was my first attempt at an AI2 diaper. The instructions were great, I did have a challenge navigating a bit with the missing pics but I eventually figured it out. Mine turned out pretty good, other than I put the tummy panel & snaps on upside down and didn't realize it until I was completely finished! :) I really appreciate all the time & effort you have put in to your tutorials! As soon as I get the Zorb I will be making the inserts.

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    1. I'm glad they turned out! I've tried uploading the pictures again a few times but for some reason some of the pictures never show up. I'm not sure what is going on. So I'm sorry the tutorial is missing some pictures. Good luck on your Cloth diapering journey!

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  57. Looks like it's time to fire up my sewing machine and start filling out my stash! Thanks so much for the tutorial, I can't wait to try my hand at this during my maternity leave!

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    1. I've since made 2 diapers using this pattern, one following the tutorial, and one with the pocket in the front. I need to tweak the back portion of the pattern a little bit, to account for the lack of pocket, but just from looking at them, I think I prefer the front pocket to the back (baby isn't here yet, so I can't try them on him to compare).

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    2. I did the same thing for baby number two (who should be here any day!) I think I like the pocket opening in the front better as well but I haven't tried it out yet. Thanks for letting me know you used my tutorial! I'm glad they turned out for you!

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  58. Wonderful instructions!! Thank You. This may sound dumb, but is there a way besides a seam ripper to adjust the leg elastic? I am so new at sewing! Thank you, have a great summer.

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    1. I guess I don't understand your question sorry. You don't have to use a seam ripper to adjust the elastic in this diaper. That is the whole point of the adjustable button hole elastic and buttons :)

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  59. Hi! I just posted my Qs but I don't think they posted so if u get a double post from me, I'm sorry!
    Ive done all the steps up to applying my buttons and this whole time the inner and outer patterns haven't lined up. The outer is wider in the rump and the wings are at different angles. I put the patterns on cardboard and spent a lot of time because I love this pattern but I'm wondering if that is how it's supposed to be. It seems like it will be a challenged to sew them together because they don't line up, you used the word "similar" to discribe the inner pattern. Are they supposed to match? If they are, why did u create 2 patterns? Thanks!

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    1. They are suppose to be that way :) stretch the inner fabric a little and pin it so that the outside edges line up with the outside edges of the PUL. I did it that way so there isn't as much extra fabric on the inside of the diaper since there isn't elastic on the inner layer like there is on the PUL layer.

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    2. I know it looks kind of funny that way, but I promise it works better having the inner layer a bit smaller and the wings a little different. Once you stretch it and sew them together and you finish the diaper you'll be able to see why it's that way :)

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    3. Is the inner pattern supposed to be a little longer as well? When I cut mine out the inner layer was a bit smaller but it was also higher in the back when I lined up the bottom inner and outer (which would be the front of the diaper completed. I also have a question about the inner layer material. I bought wicking jersey for diapers but when I tried putting it over some diaper flannel and wetting it the water just beaded up and slid off . It only soaked in when a I padded at it with my fingers. Is that what it is supposed to do? I had planned to make some of the diapers with snap rather than pocket inserts and had planned to put one layer of the wicking jersey on top and then diaper flannel for the under layers. Does this sound ok or am I going to run into problems with the urine just leaking out the sides rather than absorbing into the insert. I also tried posting this earlier but haven't seen it go through so if this is a repeat, I also apologize. Please give some advice on this as I am waiting to cut out the diaper until I hear from you as this will be my first attempt at a cloth diaper and your tutorial and ideas the best to me.

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  60. What size do you cut the fabric for the inserts? The only information I can access is the instructions for the newborn insert. Thanks.

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    1. I made two sizes of inserts - the first one is about 10.5 inches x 3.5 inches and the larger insert is about 12 in. x 4 in.

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  61. Wow - this is exactly what i have been looking for! And for all the same reasons you mentioned. Thank you so much for taking the time to share this.

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  62. What did everyone use for the reinforcement pieces? Can I just use like an old towel or T-shirt or something? I'd prefer to upcycle something instead of using the more expensive PUL or suedcloth. Thanks for any input! :)

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    1. You can really use just about any scrap material that is relatively thick and sturdy. I always just use the scrap PUL pieces that I have after cutting out the main pieces.

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  63. This is AMAZING! I can't belive what a wonderful resource the web is. Is anyone able to see photos for steps 2, 12, or 13? Despite my attempts to reload the page, I am still not able to view the associated photos.

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    1. Can you view the photos now. I tried uploading them again. Please let me know if you can't and I will try something else.

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  64. Two questions, what weight have you found these diapers to work well for in a newborn and could you re-post a couple of your pictures? Steps 12 and 13 are not showing up and I'm curious about them specifically. Thanks!

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    1. I tried uploading the photos again. Could you please let me know if you can or can't view them. My baby was born at 6 lbs 12 oz and we started using them on her when she was about a 1-2 weeks old (after her umbilical cord stump fell off). Her stump fell off really early. The photo above with the diaper shown on a baby was when my friend's baby was about 9 pounds. The diaper is super adjustable without being bulky because of the internal adjustable elastic.

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    2. I can view them now, Thanks!

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  65. Is the elastic 11 inches stretched or 11 inches relaxed ?

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  66. Thank you for this amazing pattern!! I am switching to cloth diapers and this pattern is perfect! My sewing machine and I are whipping them out with ease. Great job!

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  67. I have made several of these diapers now for my baby I am expecting in June- thank you for such a well explained tutorial! I'm curious, how do you wash/dry these? Do you need to do prep wash like I've heard you need to do for many name brand diapers?

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    1. Glad the tutorial helped! Prepping diapers all depends on the materials you used. Most natural fiber fabrics (cotton, bamboo, hemp, etc) have a natural oil in them that needs washed out in order for them to be as absorbent as possible. The actual pocket part of the diaper (not the insert) should not need prepped as it is not meant to be absorbent. But also PUL, wicking jersey, microfleece, and similar fabrics do not need prepped. Your inserts might need prepped depending on what fabrics you used. Hope that makes sense. Let me know if you have more questions.

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    2. To wash, I simply dump any solids off into the toilet. If there is still a significant amount me solids, I rinse them off. Put in my diaper pail till wash day. I wash on the warm/cold temp using the heavy cycle. I then take any covers and pocket diapers out of the wash and hang dry. The rest of the diaper (inserts, fitted diapers, etc) I rinse again until the water is clear and the diaper have no off odor. Now that I know how much soap works for us I usually only have to do one extra rinse. If I use too much soap I occasionally have to do two rinses. Any soap left over can cause stink issues. But I try not to dry my PUL diaper in the dryer so they will last as long as possible.

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  68. I am looking at trying to sew a cloth diaper for my daughter and her friends and your tutorial was definitely the best I have seen so I am planning to give it a try. I noticed another person commented about the patterns and said the inner layer seemed more narrow and did not align and you just needed to stretch the inner to fit. When I taped my pieces together the inner pattern was more narrow but also seems longer from top to bottom. The wings on the inner layer are higher on top than the outer layer if you line up the front piece. Is this correct or did they print wrong? I don't want to cut out the material incorrectly. I also have a question about the wicking jersey. When I pour water on it it just beads up and I really have to pat it to get it to soak in. Is it supposed to do that? I worry that the urine would just roll off and leak out the sides before soaking in enough to get to the insert. I had also thought about making some with inserts that snap in rather than using a pocket and had planned on making the wicking fabric the top layer and flannel or cotton diaper material for the rest. Will I run into problems doing this? I would greatly appreciate your expert opinion as I don't want to make diapers don't absorb. Thanks

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  69. Hi! Your tutorial is amazing!! I am getting ready to try one and I have my PUL and wicking jersey all ready to go but unfortunately I don't have any buttonhole elastic ☹ Do you think I could just use regular braided elastic and have the legs be non-adjustable? I assume that would limit the size range of the diaper but i thought I might add risers to the front of the diaper to help with that? Do you have any suggestions or thoughts on whether that would work? Thanks again for the great tutorial!

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    1. This is what I would try ... get elastic that is relatively wide but will still fit through the elastic casing on the diaper. Then put snaps through the elastic and also in place of the buttons. I've never tried it, but it should work. Just don't put too many snaps in the elastic or they might be too hard on baby's legs. If you make one like this, please let me know how it turns out :)

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    2. Hi! I've made a couple of tester diapers form this pattern before I went ahead and ordered all my supplies. They work great! I too didn't have buttonhole elastic, so to trial the diapers I simply cut the holes into the elastic. It's holding up really well. If it falls apart later, then I replace it with the right stuff!

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  70. I just made a bunch of these for my newborn, what a great tutorial!! One question, what kind of detergent do you use to wash these diapers?

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    1. I use the original Tide or the sensitive no scent Tide but you can use any detergent that is specifically for cloth diapers. You can look on kelly's closet (or google) which detergents are safe for cloth diapers. You pretty much just want something that doesn't leave any residues that would build up on the diapers or break them down either.

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  71. May I just say I absolutely love your pattern, I've made 7 so far. But my boys were older when I started making them and making them as is they didn't quite fit. So I decreased the seam allowance around the outer edge to 1/4 in for my last 5 and they fit perfect. I can even fit a bumgenius OS in. Thank you so so much

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  72. thanks for sharing! i don't have any kids myself so i don't really know where to start with cloth diapers, but my cousin is expecting in february and i desperately would love to make some cloth diapers for her! thank you so much for such detailed instructions!

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  73. I'm loving all the detail and the fact that this is the only pocket diaper pattern I can understand, but is there a way to skip the buttons and use the snaps on front for it to be adjustable? I know I'm not good enough at sewing to get the buttons in the right place or on at all! thanks!

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    1. You could put rise snaps on instead, but you'll have to change the reinforcment piece because you'll want the snaps reinforced. The pattern shows you where to put the buttons, it's not difficult, I promise! :)

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    2. Thanks for the response! I did it as you did with buttons and all and this is by far my favorite diaper!! I will be using this pattern to finish my stash!! Thanks so much! You're awesome!

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    3. Thanks for the response! I did it as you did with buttons and all and this is by far my favorite diaper!! I will be using this pattern to finish my stash!! Thanks so much! You're awesome!

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  74. This pattern seems great and I'm going to try my hand at a few of them. This will be the most complicated thing I've sewed. What suggestions do you have for altering the pattern to best fit my 32 pound 1.5 year old. He has outgrown his OS pockets which is why I am attempting to sew my own. Could I make any part of the pattern longer/different to allow for growth over the next year or so? (He is long torso, short legged and chunky.) Thanks for your help and the tutorial and pattern!

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    1. If you want to make the diaper longer add length in the middle of the pattern between the legs. Just make sure you add the same amount to both the inner pattern piece and the outer pattern piece. Also you'll need to add length to the elastic. Good luck :)

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  75. just wondering the width between the legs... is it wide enough to comfortably fit a hand in there for stuffing? or is the wicking jersey stretchy enough for that? just wondering if it's too narrow

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    1. my hand fits fine and I don't have any problems stuffing them. The inner wicking jersey (and I also have microfleece lined ones) is stretchy so that does help. I've never had anyone tell me that it's too hard to stuff them.

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    2. ok good to know! thanks! i will be using this pattern and tutorial next year :)

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  76. Have you ever used this pattern to make an all in one by sewing in an insert between the outer and inner layers?

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    1. I haven't. We have super hard water here and it's harder to get AIO diapers clean (which is why I made a pocket diaper with two smaller inserts instead of one larger one). :)

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  77. I have been making pocket diapers for my grandkids for 10 years. We have two new babies due in the next 3 months and by request I searched for a OS button elastic pattern. So glad I landed on your page! These were excellent instructions! I plan to make a bunch of these. The hardest thing was the last step. My machine wouldn't see the elastic edge so I hand sewed it. Just a suggestion, when it comes to the snap placement. I punched out the pattern for the snap holes and then I trace them on the reinforcement piece. It's easier to push the snaps through the backside. I have a table snap press and it makes putting in snaps a breeze, well worth the investment and they have good resale. When it comes to putting the snaps on the wings, I recommend not using the pattern but visually lining up the snaps with the front panel and then putting them on. That way any small differences in snap placement doesn't become an issue...if that makes sense.

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    1. I always put my wing snaps on like you suggested but a lot of people like the snap placement no the pattern, which is why I included it :)

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  78. Hi - I really love your design! I am in the process of making this diaper. I've fit as many PUL diaper covers out of the fabric as I can and now I am making a 'crazy quilt' diaper out of the PUL. I can't seem to get the bobbin and top thread to even make a chain on the fabric, it works with cotton but not with the PUL. I've tried a knit and universal needle but no luck.
    The internet says to try a ball point needle, wax paper on top or a walking foot. Any advice? I am going to go buy a ball point needle and give it a try. Other wise I'm out of ideas.

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  79. Thanks so much. I have been making cloth diapers now for a little while. I still consider myself a beginner. The information to another type of diaper is great. Now my second grandchild is on the way and I will be making these for him. Thanks again.

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  80. I might just give this one a try! Thanks so much!

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